So you're looking to make a career change...
Sept. 27, 2022

SUPER STRENGTHS: Why discovering your strengths is going to transform your career, w/ Jim Collison & Saurav Atri from Gallup

SUPER STRENGTHS: Why discovering your strengths is going to transform your career, w/ Jim Collison & Saurav Atri from Gallup

In order to design your career, you need to identify your strengths.

You probably have some idea what your strengths are, but maybe find it hard to put into words or figure out exactly how you can use your strengths to find the perfect job.

There is a proven assessment to help you.

Completed by almost 30 million people, the Clifton Strengthsfinder assessment is a game changer for helping you identify your strengths.



>> OUR GUESTS THIS EPISODE:

This week, we're talking to Jim Collison and Saurav Atri from Gallup. They talk about career strengths on an almost daily basis. Jim, as host of The Clifton Strengths Podcast. Saurav, as an Executive Leadership Coach for Gallup.

Jim: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimcollison/

The podcast: https://www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths/en/388469/cliftonstrengths-podcast.aspx

Saurav: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sauravatri/



>> WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  1. What the Strengthsfinder assessment is and how it works
  2. Why you need to figure out exactly what's making you unhappy at work in order to make change through the lens of your manager, your organisation, or your job.
  3. How discovering your strengths will transform your career?


>> JOIN OUR COMMUNITY:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/escapetheninetofivepod



>> TAKE HOME CHALLENGE: IDENTIFY YOUR STRENGTHS

So many people in your situation say, "I want to change career, but I just don't know what my strengths are." Identifying your strengths is a crucial part to escaping the nine to five.

Visit: www.gallup.com/cliftonstrengths and complete the assessment.



Podcast genre: career change, career transition, work life balance, great resignation.

 

Podcast also known as: escape the 9 to 5



Transcript
jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

what am I good at? What brings enjoyment? When do I find flow? Wh when am I really enjoying my job? Those are moments, all those words or moments like. when all of a sudden you got to the end of the day and you're like, whoa, man, that went fast. Well, that's an indication of flow, right? Or you're actually happy. That's an indication of happiness, right. In some of those things.

Steve:

Chances are you've gone to college, got a very respectable degree and job but yet you're not satisfied in your current career. Something needs to change. I'm Steve Oley, host and creator of escape. The nine to five, I reached in my late twenties, having qualified with a very respectable degree and landing a dream job on paper yet finding myself unhappy. And I wasn't the only one I noticed so many friends and colleagues having doubts about their career. I got curious. How do we escape the nine to five and find meaningful work while still paying the bills in order to design a career that works for you, you need to identify your strengths. You probably have some idea what your strengths are, but maybe find it hard to put into words or figure out exactly how you can use your strengths to find the perfect job. there is a proven assessment by Gallup to help you completed by almost 30 million people. The Clifton strengths finder assessment is a game changer for helping you hone in your strengths this week, we're talking to Jim Collison and Sarah of aery from Gallup. They talk about career strengths on an almost daily basis. You'll learn what the strengths finder assessment is and how it works, why you need to figure out exactly what's making you unhappy at work in order to make change through the lens of your manager, your organization, or your job. And finally how discovering your strengths will transform your career? Jim Collison is a community manager for Gallup supporting certified coaches who use Cliftons strengths on a daily basis. He also hosts the Clifton strengths podcast. so it's fair to say he's about as much of an expert on identifying and using your strengths in the workplace. As anyone in the world. I joined the conversation with Jim detailing. What Clifton's strengths is?

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

It's an assessment that any individual around the world can take. 177 questions takes about 30 minutes. We've had 20, almost 28 million people take this now. And it's all questions about you. How do you handle certain things? They're paired in a way, uh, to just try and get, to figure out some talent, what kind of talent themes do you have? And we roll those talents up into these signature themes that we call signature themes. And these themes have names like a ranger or activator or woo, which is an interesting one. these groupings of things, you can kind of put a framework around to say, well, in my top five, the top five is the very basic report. It's 20 bucks. So very inexpensive entry point to get in. If you wanna take it, that gives you these five signature themes for you to kind of figure out some things about yourself, why have this woo, that means winning over others. It's an influencing theme. It's a sales theme means I like to influence people, right. And communication, which means I like to talk well, what job matches both influencing and talking podcasting. Right. And so I've landed in a role, uh, full time in this now, by the way, that doesn't mean the best podcasters all have woo in communication. Right. It's just working for me. That was a, some clues to my talent.

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

One thing when I'm trying to explain to friends and other people, what the, um, strengths assessment is. Cause it's the thing I say to everybody, if they're saying, oh, I don't really know what I wanna do. I'm not really enjoying my job. One of the first things I always tell people to do is go and do a strengths finder assessment. But I always struggle to, explain for example, someone who's a builder, there's not a strength to say you're practical or you're good at hammering in nails or you're good at, um, project management. It's more, how would you explain how the strengths have in grouped?

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

Let's look at it first through the story I told in the beginning where we think about all the roles that I've done. Right. And so, you know, I was a subject matter expert. Well, first I worked in retail, so I was sales. Right. And then I did it, help desk support for a while. And then I built data warehouses for a while. And then I was a project manager for a while. All those roles take a certain set of talents. Right. I was fairly successful in all of those roles, applying these talent themes. I didn't know, during, in those days, I didn't always know why I was doing it as a retail banker. I was really good cuz I have this high influence. Like I wanted to talk to people and sell 'em things. Right. So that, that was something that, that worked out very well. You know, I was doing data warehousing and it was very nerdy, very technical. Right. my customer was our, our marketing department. I mean, there, that doesn't, that seems like no, that's almost too good to be true, but our marketing department sold things. And so I was giving data to our marketing department who was doing marketing campaigns and having influencing, I really liked that. So having them as a partner was an area, right. Allowed me to kind of use some of these talents. So I didn't mean I wasn't good at any of those jobs. I was pretty good at 'em. the job I'm in right now fits really, really well. And so that, yeah, you'd kind of be like, well, that's a no brainer, right. That fits. So doesn't always necessarily lock you in to say, oh no, you can't do those kinds of things. It just gives me some clues on like, okay, because I have these themes, four of the five you mentioned, we group all 34 of these themes into four domains. So we, you know, we talk about strategic thinking, relationship building, influencing, and executing. Those are the four themes. Now four of my top five are in influencing themes. So on the surface I can start saying well, okay. Even if I'm in a role that isn't necessarily ideal for me, at least. I think if I can tell the folks around me, Hey. Listen, I'm a pretty good influencer. Like put me in coach. put me in those places where I can have an influencing role. Chances are all, you'll get better success outta me. Well, that increases my success odds, right. I call it house odds. You know, when you go to Vegas and the house has house odds, they always win by the way, the house has the favor in this. So if I could have house odds in my own career, or at least maybe I don't get it right all the time, but more often than not, well, shoot, that's a lot better than betting against the house right. In, in that. So that's, that's kind of how I see that kind of layout. When, when we think about a career.

Steve:

So after you do the questionnaire online, you'll be shown your 34 strengths from number one to 34. These are grouped into four domains, executing, influencing relationships and strategic think. The report identifies your top strengths, how best they can be utilized as well as giving you an idea, which domain your strongest in. if you come out high in executing traits, maybe you need to be in a leadership role. If you come out high in relationships. maybe you need to be in a role working with or helping people. the other thing I like about the strengths finder assessment is how solid the information is. Some of the assessments you get online are free, but you may as well read a horoscope. The strengths finder assessment is different.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

We do have a ton of research behind the work that we've done. We've had 28 million of these taken. We're constantly looking at it to say like, Hey, are we getting this right? how accurate is this? So yeah, I, I like it from a tool standpoint. I like it, from that aspect of it. Right. So you get some reliability, let's just, let's just call it that.

Steve:

Sarah of Ari is an executive leadership coach for Gallup. He is an ICF accredited coach who has used his experience with Cliftons strengths to help thousands of people redesign their careers. He shares the story behind Clifton's strength and how it essentially acts as a mirror to see yourself more clearly.

Saurav:

I'm a huge believer in opening your mind, unlocking that part of you, that you've not discovered for yourself. different strengths essentially is a language of human understanding. You to understand how people think, how people feel and how people behave. people who are listening in, who've not heard of different strengths before. Well, uh, essentially if. Go back to the 1950s and sixties, at that point in time, the whole field of psychology was focused on what is wrong with people, psychosis, neurosis, all the disease of human mind. Uh, then there was this amazing genius. Well, uh, gentleman called Dr. Donald O Clifton, who is the father of Clifton strengths and the grandfather of positive psychology. And at that point in time, he wanted to study. And if you think about the modern world, if you have to study success, you'll Google seven habits of successful people, or, books around, you know, biographies of successful leaders. What they've done really well in their life. But back in the fifties, there was no books, especially in the field of psychology that talked about what is right with people. Uh, the whole field of psychology, as I said, is focused on what is wrong with people. So they, Don Clifton took this on himself that, Hey, let's go and find out what makes people. So then he went and interviewed 2 million people across 50 countries around the world. Really kind of know, similar to what you're doing, asking them, Hey, what do you do so well, you know, what did you struggle in and how did you achieve success? So really unpacking their life stories and what he was listening for was patterns in their behaviors, in their thinking, in their feeling, in their behaving. And then he captured all those patterns and think of it. Like he put them into a big swimming pool, a philosophical. and then he said, your ability to work hard, having a checklist of things to do, having a stamina, these are different patterns in somebody's behavior. He took them from that pool and put them into a bucket and he then devised a name for that bucket. And he called it achiever. So then similarly, he was able to grip all these thousands of talents that he was able to identify human behaviors and he grouped them into 34 categories and he gave them specific names. So think of it like a new language. He devised to understand human nature and he gave. Category a name. And then he devised a psychometric assessment, and based on those responses, it, it basically gives you a report. And what does that report capture is? Which category is where you lean on? Where does your most potential of success lie? So it arranges those 34 buckets in order of intensities with your most intense buckets at. And that these intense buckets, the bottom of the list there. So essentially that's what, uh, a Clifton strength assessment is. It's an understanding of where you have the potential to succeed. And if you invest your time doing that, you can really strengthen them and turn them into your strengths of those talents, those behaviors, those patterns. So it's a really good insight, a mirror into yourself,

Steve:

if you're not thriving in your current job, it might be really hard to identify your own career strengths. This is what the strengths finder assessment will do for you. When I did the strengths finder assessment. It wasn't necessarily some eye opening revelation, but what it did was it helped me narrow down and focus what my core strengths were. I don't expect all the results will come as a complete surprise to you, but there's no doubt. There will be some strengths. You never even knew you possessed. it will also help you clarify which direction your career should be heading, whether or not you choose to leave your current workplace, it will be appointed to what specific strengths you should be using on a daily basis. At the time of doing the strengths funder assessment, I was working as a clinical veterinarian. my top three strengths were identified as futuristic thinking, strategic thinking and communication. These are high influencing traits. So what do you think I did? I got a role in marketing for an animal health company. Was this my dream job? No, but it was a step in the right direction. The strengths finder assessment is not going to magically give you a dream job overnight, but it will point your compass in a better direction. Not every guest on escape. The nine to five wants to leave the corporate workplace. So Jim Collison shares how he escaped the nine to five within his own workplace and how he uses his strengths on a daily basis.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

So I'm in the corporate space, right. And I don't necessarily wanna leave the corporate space. I'm a corporate guy. Right. But I can be what I like to call an entrepreneur on inside in the, you know,

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

which is

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

changing things from the inside. Yeah. Making my own thing happen by the way. Was that guaranteed? No. Were there huge risks in it? Absolutely. There were a couple times I thought they were gonna be like, yeah, we've had enough of this. Like, it's time for you to move on type deal. Right. And even, even today, I have those moments. I say things and I'm like, should I have really been that bold? what that allows me to do then is to start thinking about, okay, what am I good at? What brings enjoyment? When do I find flow? Wh when am I really enjoying my job? Those are moments, all those words or moments like. when all of a sudden you got to the end of the day and you're like, whoa, man, that went fast. Well, that's an indication of flow, right? Or you're actually happy. That's an indication of happiness, right. In some of those things. And so I think we gotta take a look back, regardless of whether we're doing our own gig or inside corporate and say, what are some things that I've done in the past that I've had success at that I've that have made me happy and then layer this Clifton strengths report over the top of it and see if you can give some names to it, like, okay, let's apply the framework, which all it is, it's no magic, right? It's just a framework that, of some things based on your answers that we can put into some words that may answer some questions by itself. Right. But if you're in the corporate space that may give you some tools to help your manager with you, listen. There's been many times Steve, I've been in a conversation where somebody said, Hey, can you do this? And sometimes I go, oh yeah, I, I can knock that outta the park. The hard part is sometimes say, you know, that's really not the best use of my talent. Now that's risky. Cuz you feel like, oh now you're not a team player, but in teams that understand this, they'll realize, do I really, I, I really wanna use the best tool for the job. And so if I'm being, if I'm being honest with people, I'm like, look, I'm not good at follow up. I just am not. So if you're gonna put me in a role where there's gonna be a lot of follow up, there's gonna be a lot of trouble. So I'm just, you know, in teams that are open and honest, boy that can have some, some real benefit.

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

Yeah, and I feel like sitting down, if you, especially if it's a relatively small team and if you were sitting down with your, top five in front of each other, or just even the sort of full report, and having an open discussion about where your strengths lie, you'd probably find that everyone would have their area that could be a focus and then you'd understand each other better and be able to work more effectively as a team. And on top of that, I would say that people will enjoy themselves more because everyone will be working to their strengths.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

In a nutshell, that's exactly what we're looking for, right. Is to, to try and line that up. Doesn't happen overnight. It takes time. It takes repeated conversations like you, a team needs to continually think about this. Like, Hey, have we lined up properly or are we all doing the right things?

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

If we look at your top five, you've mentioned woo and communication. what are the other three? And can you sort of summarize what those are?

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

Yeah. So I have I'll I'll list them in order. So I have a ranger woo. Maximizer communication and activator. Right? So a ranger, I have visualizations cuz I'm a visual guy. So I have a visualizations from 'em all a ranger is just, I can keep plate spinning. Thousands of 'em all at the same time. Now the backside, I don't have any detail on any of those. I just keep things moving. I'm a firefighter, not a farmer, right. That I don't, I can't plant and wait, I don't have the patience. I want to go out every day and do something new. Right. So that's how it's described to me. Woo. We already talked about winning over others. It's a, influencing theme, that I like to go out and get people to move. That's why I'm on your podcast, right? It's cuz I want to get people to move in a different direction. Maximizer is either, uh, quality or quantity. I, I either, I, I like to make things better or I like to do more of them when I decided to run marathons. I couldn't run just one. I had to run five. I think that says it all right. That most people run one and check it off, right? No, not enough. And I did Mount Evans where you run up to a 14,000 foot peak. I couldn't just do one. I had to do all of them. Right. All of the things communication we talked about, I love to talk. The key to that is I, I learn and, influenced by talking. So I need to email. I'm terrible. I'm actually, that's not a thing I like to do. If I'm having a conflict with somebody, I gotta talk to 'em. If I wanna get things done, I gotta talk to 'em. I win talking. I don't win emailing. Right. So communication, some people think, oh, all forms are ation. No, for me, it's really primarily the talking influence that works well for me. And then finally I have activator that fits in with the whole theme of things. The firefighter, not a farmer. I like to activate on things. Hey, we have an idea. Let's do it right now, right now. Yeah. Let's do it right now. Right. So those are my five.

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

And, and to go back to your comment about communication in terms of how it looks for you. That's the other thing about the assessment is it's not, completely black and white in that it does break it down more in terms of specifically, you know, like my communication might look very different to what your communication is. I'm actually quite, uh, I quite like writing and putting things into words. So, uh,

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

And that doesn't mean you're right and I'm wrong or you're wrong. And I'm right. It's just the way it, the way it looks on me, when you get your top five, you get a report called the, the strengths insight report. And that's five, some 5,000 statements that we put together based on your rank order of all 34. And we give it to you in your top five, they're written like a paragraph. And so it gives you some of that takes the standard definition and blows it out a little bit because we know. So it starts giving you some clues. Listen, is it the gospel truth about you? No, The key is that you spend time reading it, interacting with it, and then saying, cuz really you, you determine what your strengths are. They don't determine you,

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

And when I looked at my top five strengths at the time, I was really going through a career dilemma in terms of what I want to do next. And I think within the assessment, it all the results, it shows some suggestions in terms of what kind of careers or jobs might be good for you. And so what I did was for my top five is I wrote all the key kind of career or areas. That was suggested for that strength, repeated it for the top five and then highlighted common themes. And it started to paint a picture in my mind, doesn't give you like a, a complete diagnosis, but it definitely gives you a good nudge in the right direction as to what you should be doing. Because I started to notice that there was, you know, like for example, I think journalism came up about three times. Teaching came up about three times and there were a couple others I can't remember, or maybe marketing and sales came up a few times as well. And so it started to paint a little bit of a picture of areas that could work to my strengths.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

Yeah. And it would give you some things to try. it would point you in a few directions to be like, Hey, maybe I could try this, or maybe I could try that. Right. It just gives you some clues. Then you gotta go do. At that point, then it's just like, okay, well, will it be? I think sometimes people get stuck. Like I don't wanna make the wrong career decision. Well then they just float around, like make a decision and determine if you like it or not. If you don't like it, move on.

Steve:

I cannot emphasize this enough. The worst decision you can make for your career is to do nothing. If you're unhappy in your current job, Any change is a step in the right direction. My suggest. Do the strength finder assessment for the record, I get no financial incentive for recommending Clifton's strengths. I just found the results so useful for my own career change. I recommend it to everyone. Find your top five strengths from the assessment and find a role that will better utilize your strength. You're not going to find your dream career overnight, but making a change now is going to put you one step closer to your dream job, Escape. The nine to five is not necessarily saying throw in the towel and become an entrepreneur because for some of you, the uncertainty of being an entrepreneur is terrifying.

steve_1_06-16-2022_073503:

And unless you're really driven and you know exactly what it is you want to do becoming an entrepreneur might not be the right. So people just need to find ways to make work, work for them, whether that's changing, you know, as you say, changing within the organization or whether they actually need to leave, but they could potentially go to another corporate job and, and escaping the nine to five is not to say that all corporates are bad, or don't ever take a corporate job. It might be finding one that suits your strengths more and then saying to them, I'm gonna love it here. This role is gonna be perfect for me, but in order for it to be completely ideal for me, there needs to be a bit of flexibility in terms of remote work. And I don't want to be someone that's, you know, has to clock in at nine o'clock and has to leave at 5:00 PM. And this is probably the best time in history to ever actually negotiate and say, these are the hours that are gonna work for me, and this is how you're gonna get the best outta me.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

Yeah, you're you're right on. And I think we need to continue to interview the organization as much as they interview us. Right. If you're going in for a job and man, what if you got the opportunity to ask, Hey, so gimme, give me three of your corporate values, right? What do you here? Right. If they can't answer that question. they could still be a great company, but you have to consider like, if they can't, if they're hiring you for a job and they cannot express those three corporate values. Mm-hmm well, you know? Okay. And it's more, uh, I mean, yes, it's important remote or whatever workplace, workplace environment, how do they value recognition? Some of those kinds of things I think are super important. So they're, you've gotta go in asking those questions. If you're gonna, if you're gonna change during this time, you gotta go in fully, fully prepared to ask those questions.

Steve:

Now you've probably got a fair idea. What Clifton's strengths. How exactly does identifying your strengths help? I joined back with Sarah of eery.

Saurav:

Making any change that means you are changing your job that you're working in right now to choose a self-employment profession, entrepreneurship. So entrepreneurship, or you are even getting promoted from one role to another role. That's a change or personal life change as. I see all these changes are journeys from the known to the unknown. And that for me is, not as easy for people to embark on and on that journey is a small bridge between the known to the unknown and then from the unknown to the. people are very skeptical to go on this bridge from the known to unknown first, because they're in the comfort zone. It's difficult for them to leave, even though they know that they're not fulfilled in the zone of knowingness right now. And their heart is telling them their brain is in the move, in that zone of unknown. But something is blocking that view. And that for them is called fear. Fear of. and what connects that bridge is that bridge of self-awareness. So the answers for whether you should make that switch or not is not outside it's inside. And that's what the importance of Clifton strengths is. It's a window into your, who you are, where you get your energies from what your needs are. And while you try to open the window for yourself, but your own biases gets in the way for, to see yourself. It's like this, right? It's that bridge is like the bridge of your. It's so close to you that it's so hard for you to see yourself, unless you see a mirror, right? The coaches that mirror for you to see that bridge off your nose, that'll help you move from that zone of known to a note. And then once you are landed in the zone of the new territory, to help them navigate that unknown. They need to have a support system. a coach provides a support system where they may not have the answers for you, but they have the right questions to help you unpack your answers because you're not in a, a, well, most of them are not in a, good zone mentally because unknown, they already little skeptical. What should I do? Then when you're in the zone of skepticism, what happens in your brain? It starts releasing a lot of different chemicals, cortisol that creates stress, you know, endorphins, dopamine. So mix of, uh, a cocktail of emotions happening in your brain that sometimes, clouds, how you see the world around you in the moment, a job of a coach is to help you gain clarity.

Steve:

I would go as far as to say that, even for people not keen to go as far as doing the whole coaching course, even just going online and doing the, the strength based assessment. getting that information along with the sort of supportive material that comes with. It just does open your eyes for a start. I personally just did the online assessment at first and I found that information really useful doing the coaching course was that additional thing to really hone in on how I can use my strengths better. And I found it really useful, but just doing the assessment itself, I. that, and alone is a great starting point for people looking to make a change, What three tips does Sarah have for escaping the nine to five?

Saurav:

the first tip I would offer Steve. Answering this question for themself, what are they good at? That they can become the world's best in. Now, when I ask people this question for themselves, less than 10% of people are RA able to raise the hand of this question, cuz we have not spent enough time thinking about ourselves from that perspective. If I ask you, what are you terrible at? What are your weaknesses? I bet you can rally across a whole list of things that you're terrible at. Isn't it? Because it's human nature, right? We are so fixated at trying to find what's wrong with people in ourselves to forget, to find the goodness in us. So first start by answering this. what is it that you're skilled in, that you can become great at?

Steve:

I a hundred percent agree with that question, but I think that a lot of people see that in terms of being the best in the world at it, and they say, well, there's no way in how I'm gonna be the best in the world at this. And they use that as an excuse, not to actually ask themselves that question. You don't need to be the best in the world at something you just need to be that sort of top 1% in that area. And if it's something that you're skilled at and interested in chances are, you've already narrowed yourself down into that small percentage of people that are gonna be good in that area.

Saurav:

Absolutely. And you've sort of hit the nail on the head there. So I say this, you know, excellence happens at the intersection of what people do best and what they enjoy doing. So they have to answer this. What have I great at what have I got risk recognition for what I've seen glimpses of excellence for myself. And then also, what do I enjoy doing? If those two things intersect, you know, you can achieve great successes on that, on that space. The second thing, I would say is your ability to concent. If you can build that ability for yourself, you can become masterful in anything that you seek to be. Uh, I say growth happens whoever, and whatever you give attention to the challenge is when you ask people, can you pay attention to this? Well, try it out. Try paying attention to something within five minutes. You'll start seeing your mind wandering. well, because we've trained our mind. Thanks to the notification world, to look at a phone, you can do this, that you can't pay attention to anything at all. Right. That's a big challenge. turns out Dale Carnegie. It's interesting. I was hearing this story. What made him so successful? Turns out somebody asked him. So what's the secret of your success? He said, I can concentrate on something for five minutes. That's all I can have full concentration and have to go five minutes. And when people try to do that, it's so difficult, especially. Even with human beings, you know why relationships are struggling in the world right now because people can't pay attention to each other's needs and perspectives and behaviors

Steve:

I was just gonna add my 2 cents to that concentrate, aspect. And I, I feel this as much as anyone. I literally just heard the other day that if you're doing a task and someone distracts you, it generally takes your brain 15 to 20 minutes to get back to concentration. and I've heard this concept of deep work, which is the idea that if. Turn off your emails, you get rid of your phone and you focus on something. The most work that you can do in a day is four hours generally. And yet we sort of force ourselves to sit in these offices for eight to nine hours or more, doing unproductive work because the email goes off every five minutes or your phone rings. but actually if we sort of focus more and as you say, concent, We can get it a lot more done and a lot more effective work done in a shorter space of time.

Saurav:

There's enough books written about this. You call that flow. Can you stay in a state of flow for a sustained period of. And, you know, you'll find that sort of flow in the areas, which you are great at and you enjoy doing, or at least the enjoyment has to be there for that flow to exist. If you're doing work on a daily basis that you're not enjoying, then that flow will be abrupted because your energies and your mind will say, I don't like this. The brain will re cortisol. I don't like this. They will move away from that. So the brain is a very tricky tool. We have an organ, we have that also gets in the way for us to concentrate. Why? Because if it gets dopamine, it gets attracted. If it gets cortisol, it wants to shut off from it. I say pick up activities that does give you dopamine. That is beneficial for you. A lot of time, we pick up activities that a brain wants that is not beneficial for you. That's when you're building really bad habits for yourself, that will not help you re achieve success in your life you're taking two steps back. Every single time you take that. And you've trained your brain to feel good with that behavior. That's the worst thing it's called self sabotage. Third thing for me would be, build your discipline to follow through because it's consistent behaviors. That'll help you create the new habit for your brain. So to move that into your fast thinking brain, what I call the autopilot or the subconscious brain, your brain moves into a autopilot behavior with good. Success becomes a habit for you then until then you're training your brain to actually be a failure every day, without even realizing it build discipline to follow through on good habits every day. a good activities that create success. One step forward, one step forward. So it's small, incremental, habital behaviors. That's actually helping achieve success every day will help you create long-term success as well. You've heard them enough in books of atomic habits and many other things out there, but the way I want to rerate this is this it's what conscious application of your behaviors through discipline conscious application.

Steve:

Everyone is familiar with the concept of how investing small amounts of money and shares every day will result in a big payout at retirement. It's the same for personal growth investors, small amount of time each and every day into your own personal growth. Even though you may not see the results in the days, weeks, and months, it will pay off in the long. We've had some advice from Sarah a I now ask Jim, what three pieces of advice he'd give to someone unhappy in their job.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

First of all, ask yourself the question. What am I really unhappy about? I think that's key. cuz there's, a couple things. one, it can be the organization, right? Like I don't share the same values or the same ethics that this organization shares. Right. So it could be, the organization could be your manager, Where you've got a bad manager. Who's who's not treating you well, right? That happens. We see that happen all the time. We, we know if Gallup would say people don't leave jobs. They leave managers. That's that's a, a phrase. I think we've, we've said we've added in 70% of a team's engagement is, is solely based on the manager. so might be the organization might be the manager might just be the job, right? You just may not be in the right fit for what you're doing. And so if you're struggling in your role right now, those are the, the three filters I would use to have an honest conversation with yourself to say, okay, what's the real problem here? What am I really discontent about? give it some time, really figure some things out. Cuz I think it's an important question to ask then. I think once you have that, then you know what you need to do or at least you have a direction to go from, you know, if it's the organization or the manager, you might need to look somewhere else. Right? If it's the manager, maybe it can be inside the organization. If it's you. Okay, well then we need to figure out some things to do about you. Can you reapply yourself to the current job that you have to make that better? or just do you need to do something different? Does it need to be a variation of something that you're doing or does it need to be completely different? Just cuz you wanna change jobs doesn't mean that the job that you need is available out there. Right? We also have to talk about availability depending on where you live, that job, that, that perfect job may not be there. You may need to move to do something different. Right? So I think I, I, I hope that gets to the, that fulfills the three things. but those are, as I think about it, that's the, that's the process I would go about if I was.

Steve:

understanding your strengths will transform your career. You might have some idea what your career strengths are. This assessment will make you more aware of your career strengths and how you can use them. We finished this week's episode with Jim Collison summarizing what the strengths assessment does for him.

jim-collison--he-him-_1_06-15-2022_143503:

it's kind of like having a coach. That's watched you your whole. And it, it can just open some doors and, and let me reiterate it. It does not define you, you define you, right. It's just a it's for us. It's our best, it's our best guess at how you are built. Right. But it gives you those house odds and I'll take house odds any day of the week. if I'm doing something and so it just gives me the ability to have a little bit more information than I'd have before and, uh, and gives me a chance to be a better version of myself

Steve:

That was Jim Collison and Sarah Vetri from Gallup. You can find the strengths finder assessment at gallup.com/clifton strengths. You can find out more about Jim at LinkedIn dot. Ford slash in Ford slash Jim Collison. and we'll be sharing an episode of his podcast at Gallup, the Clifton strengths podcast. Next week, you can find out more about Sarah at linkedin.com/in/sarah ERY, three tips from Sarah about escaping nine to five work one. What is one thing you've been recognized as excellent at? And what do you enjoy doing where these two things intersect? You will have found something you can be great at to improve your concentration. Start by giving something your absolute and full concentration for five minutes, three, build discipline through good habits. If you're serious about finding work that works for you, this means spending time every day, working on your strengths, make a routine where you spend 30 minutes each and every day working on your strengths until it becomes a habit. I'll summarize. Jim's three tips into one statement. Ask, what are you unhappy about? Is it your manager? Is it your organization or is it genuinely your job? Knowing the answer to this question will help you understand if you need a new manager, if you need to leave the organization, or if you genuinely need to leave your job. This week's challenge is called. Identify your strengths, so many people in your situation. Say to me, I want to change career, but I just don't know what my strengths are. If you've taken anything out of today's episode. You'll know that identifying your strengths is a crucial part to escaping the nine to five. so today visit dub, do do.gallop.com/clifton strengths and complete the assessment. I promise you, you will discover something about yourself. You never really realized and will use this information to help you design a career to work for you. So this week identify your strengths. Thanks for listening to escape the nine to five. If you'd like help on your own career journey, be sure to join our Facebook group escape, the nine to five podcast. They're your meet a group of like-minded professionals, also on a journey out of the nine to five job. this week. We'll be discussing everybody's Clifton strengths results, and how you can use them to design a career to work for you. I'm Steve OE your host, and thanks as always for listening to escape the nine to five.